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A Better Worldview – Watching Foreign Films With Satellite TV

A Better Worldview – Watching Foreign Films With Satellite TV

Getting a better cultural IQ definitely takes a bit of work. After all, not everyone can afford to head off to liberal arts school, where classes sometimes come as electives, rather than requirements. And even those who do head off with visions in their head of exciting afternoons packed with Godard classics sometimes find themselves demystified in an academic environment that spends more time focusing on    Séries Netflix   the economy or working to recontextualize the popularity of satellite tv in the current political process. It’s simply not as easy as it used to be to simply kick back and enjoy a well-made foreign film in a classroom these days.

However, those who have a thirst for different cultures and long for a chance to see well-rounded selections of cinema don’t have to spend a ton of money on an education to get what they want. In a world where Netflix offers up a startling number of foreign films and even middle-of-nowhere theaters are starting to change their options, it’s easier than ever before to enjoy a piece of cinema from anywhere in the world. Add to this the fact that regular satellite tv packages now make it possible to add international channels and more esoteric film picks, and the entire oeuvre of countless directors is only a single click of a remote away.

The best starting place for foreign film on television at home is actually Turner Classic Movies or the Independent Film Channel, depending on the decade viewers are hoping for. While TCM might focus more on American classics, they do show films from other countries from time to time, especially when renowned American directors are talking about their favorites. Martin Scorcese’s interest in reviving Italian cinema led to a number of popular old Italian films being shown on TCM, making it easy for anyone who is interested in the history of not just cinema, but also culture, to get an incredible look at materials that would otherwise be very difficult to obtain.

At the same time, anyone with an HDTV and a dish can suddenly enjoy art-house fare that would never reach small towns otherwise. With IFC’s focus on everything from current documentaries to old classics of French and Indian cinema, every night of the week brings a different chance to see something truly unique. And Sundance does the same with its programming, focusing on everything from airing the renowned recent documentary “Born Into Brothels” towards giving never-before-seen Pasolini documentary clips a chance to make their way to satellite tv for an evening or two.

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